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Chrysler Town & Country

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1994
2014
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2014 Chrysler Town & Country What's new for 2014? 
2014 Chrysler Town & Country

To celebrate 30 years of making minivans (starting with the Dodge Caravan and Plymouth Voyager), Chrysler Group is introducing anniversary editions with special badging and features like Alcantara suede accents.

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2013 Chrysler Town & Country What's new for 2013? 
2013 Chrysler Town & Country

For 2013, the Town & Country now offers a new Blu-Ray disc player with an HDMI port for game consoles, trailer-sway control and a pair of rear-seat USB ports for charging mobile devices.

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2012 Chrysler Town & Country What's new for 2012? 
2012 Chrysler Town & Country

Heavily revised for 2011 with new styling and the class-leading horsepower of Chrysler's new Pentastar V6, the Town & Country edges higher in refinement for 2012. Leather seating and rear-seat DVD entertainment are now standard on all trim levels.

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2011 Chrysler Town & Country
2011 Chrysler Town & Country
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2010 Chrysler Town & Country What's new for 2010? 
2010 Chrysler Town & Country

For 2010, front seat active head restraints are added to the standard equipment list of the Chrysler Town & Country.

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2009 Chrysler Town & Country What's new for 2009? 
2009 Chrysler Town & Country

Both the LX and Limited receive more standard equipment. LX trims now feature three-zone air conditioning, second-row power windows and third-row power vent windows as well as a combination temperature/compass/trip computer gauge. New options include a Blind Spot Monitoring system, dual 9-inch DVD view screens with swiveling third-row screen and the Rear Cross Path system, which warns drivers backing up of objects approaching them.

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2008 Chrysler Town & Country What's new for 2008? 
2008 Chrysler Town & Country

Beneath the surface of its boxier, more masculine styling, the fifth-generation Town & Country offers improved powertrains, more contemporary interior styling and class-exclusive options like satellite TV (offering three family channels) and clever second-row seating options. The shorter-wheelbase Town & Country model is no longer.

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2007 Chrysler Town & Country
2007 Chrysler Town & Country
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2006 Chrysler Town & Country
2006 Chrysler Town & Country
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2005 Chrysler Town & Country
2005 Chrysler Town & Country
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2004 Chrysler Town & Country
2004 Chrysler Town & Country
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2003 Chrysler Town & Country
2003 Chrysler Town & Country
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2002 Chrysler Town & Country
2002 Chrysler Town & Country
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2001 Chrysler Town & Country
2001 Chrysler Town & Country
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2000 Chrysler Town & Country
2000 Chrysler Town & Country
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1999 Chrysler Town & Country
1999 Chrysler Town & Country
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1998 Chrysler Town & Country
1998 Chrysler Town & Country
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1997 Chrysler Town & Country
1997 Chrysler Town & Country
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1996 Chrysler Town & Country
1996 Chrysler Town & Country
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1995 Chrysler Town & Country
1995 Chrysler Town & Country
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1994 Chrysler Town & Country
1994 Chrysler Town & Country
About Chrysler Town & Country

Thirty years ago the Chrysler Group created the modern minivan, and five years later it introduced the first luxury one – the Town & Country. Fast-forward to today and the Town & Country retains its mission of being a minivan with maximum amenities. Chrysler's 7-passenger hauler carries a higher base price than competitors such as the Honda Odyssey, Toyota Sienna and Nissan Quest, but when considering that it comes with niceties like leather seating and a DVD entertainment system to keep the kids occupied, its cost make more sense. Practical and safety features also abound to ease the burden on Mom and Dad, such as Stow `n Go seating and blind-spot monitoring. Add in surprising horsepower, and the Town & Country becomes a minivan you actually want to drive – with or without the family.

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Consumer Reviews

In depth review of The Sienna vs Town and Country

By on Wednesday, August 07, 2013

I own this car - My approximate mileage is 10

10 9.0
overall rating 9 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
9/10
Value
10/10
Reliability
Not Rated
Quality
10/10
Performance
10/10
Styling
10/10
Comfort
10/10

Pros: "Great Drive,Terrific Features,Classy Looking Van"

Cons: "It's a van, but what we needed"

Likely to recommend this car? (1-10): 10

"I’ve never written a review, but then I’ve never spent over 16 hours trying to help my wife select a van. By way of background I would explain that my wife, who has a handicapping condition, was purchasing a converted van which will be further modified with hand controls. The dealer sells a wide array of makes and models with handicapped conversions to accommodate wheel chairs, etc. and has no stake in the buyer’s specific choice other than to help the buyer make a choice with which he will be happy. This setting provided a perfect place for a side-by-side comparison. The final 8 hours of the process was spread over 2 days and involved my sister-in-law, an English professor; my wife, a former school teacher, retired from the staff of a local college, and is a great interior decorator; and me, a retired engineer. This gave us a fairly diverse background of reviewers. We all spent extra hours at home reading and checking the internet developing our own opinions before this last 8 hours of actual see it, feel it, and drive it tests. We had gone to an Expo in Houston at the Reliant Center and viewed the various models there as well as at the dealer and had narrowed the field to the Toyota Sienna and the Chrysler Town and Country. I was bias toward Toyota from my reading of reports as was my sister-in-law who owns a recently purchased Lexus (Toyota). My wife, with the refined eye of an interior decorator, loved the Chrysler good looks, but seemed resigned to a Toyota selection from prior conditioning of their reputation and the other reviewers’ perspectives. We had two very knowledgeable salesmen involved in the process that kept us honest in our point-by-point evaluations. I will say, as an engineer, that our team make-up made it a challenge to really adopt a true “process”, and I gave up trying (maybe my wife, who was to be the buyer and decision maker, will forgive me over the next 20 to 30 years). On the shop floor we did a side-by-side inspection of the features. I will leave out the specifics of the evaluation of the conversion package as that is a specialty issue. We reviewed the Chrysler Touring and the Toyota Sienna XLE, supposedly comparable levels of models. We were quick to notice that there were more amenities inside the Chrysler even though the sticker prices were very close. The seats were more comfortable and form fitting in the Chrysler, maybe due to the use of memory foam as explained by our salesman. They also had more adjustment on the passenger side seat which aided my wife in entry. The layout and functionality of the consoles on both vans were good, but the Chrysler’s seemed more refined. The “blind spot” monitor in the external rear view mirrors of the Toyota was a big plus. My wife preferred the closer gear shift and its labeling on the Toyota. Both had good rear view cameras and sensors, which is a major improvement in newer model safety. Many of the extra amenities of the Chrysler were not items on our shopping list (nor was the sunroof on the Toyota) though there were more of them as part of the base model in the Chrysler. The tail gate close button on the Toyota is on the raised tailgate that my relatively short sister-in-law could not reach whereas the Chrysler’s was located on the side of the opening, but then all is on the key fob (but it was in the car). All doors function smoothly and I loved the open entry the rear doors present (grocery shopping will be more fun). You can play with the touch screen controls on the dash and everyone can have a personal preference. Although I love doing this, it was not a high priority for my evaluation and I was satisfied observing the salesman show all the great features with which I will spend many contented hours. Both seem more than adequate, intuitive and user friendly. There are many other nice features both vehicles have in common but are without any great distinction. From an external appearance these are two different vehicles, and you may judge for yourself based upon your own preferences. For my wife the Chrysler was the clear winner. The true decision maker for most of us comes in the driving and ride. For this, the three of us took turns in all seat positions, except for the fact that my wife could not drive due to the lack of soon to be installed hand controls. My sister-in-law, owning a Lexus, was somewhat expecting the Toyota to win this. Having driven the Toyota early in the process, but not the Chrysler, I was convinced we would drive away in a Toyota as it was a great experience. After all Consumers Reports said I would prefer the Sienna. This was where my bubble burst. The Chrysler was every bit as solid a feel and as comfortable as the Toyota. The steering in the parking lot seemed slightly easier in the Toyota, probably due to electronic steering, but there was no noticeable difference at speed. Acceleration was smoother in the Toyota but was not as responsive for quick jump in speed which might be critical on our Houston freeways. Maybe that is because of the 6 speed transmission in the Chrysler. Especially notable in the Chrysler was the quick response to a jerk and return of the steering wheel that would be necessary to avoid a fender bender from one of our highway demolition derby drivers. This was extremely responsive and solid without the sway experienced in the Toyota which seemed more top heavy but is probably due to differences in the suspension systems. The rides were comparable in both vehicles and any differences in the rear were attributed to the conversion packages. In the final point-by-point review our salesman made us go though, the three of us were surprisingly close in our analysis. We probably had 12-13 points in favor of the Chrysler to 3-4 for the Toyota. When priced out, partly due to Chrysler having rebates which Toyota does not offer, Chrysler was priced lower. If you wanted yet another tie-breaker, my wife wins with having her choice of vehicles based on appearance. The Chrysler is an elegant conveyance that is in good company in the Theater District, where the Toyota is more at home at Gilly’s (that is if Gilly’s still existed, and we Texans wish it did). Chrysler was the clear winner. So what happened and what are my conclusions? Some comes from our debrief with one of the salesmen who was a long term Chrysler employee and student of what they were doing. He believes having hired Quality Control experts from the best companies has paid off in Chrysler’s continuous improvement process and they are no longer in the shadow of the Japanese manufactures. He also had some intimate knowledge to explain some of what they had done. Looking more closely at the 2013 Consumer’s Guide, their opinion survey is based on the 2011 survey and last road tests on Aug. 2011 for Chrysler and September 2010 for Toyota. What’s with that? Are they behind the curve and had no actual data to offer an opinion on the 2013 models when they sent me the guide early in 2013? What happened to continuous improvement (the cornerstone of Quality Control) or reflections in major model changes (which usually brings reliability down for a time)? Based on these factors they predicted a slightly better reliability for the Toyota. But we can buy a 100,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty for $3,400 and still have money left over, buying the Chrysler. Is Toyota resting too much on its past (and deserved) reputation that they feel they do not need to offer rebates or a lower price or more base model features? Maybe there is hope to a resurgent US/Canadian auto industry. Congratulations to our friends in Canada who built our new van. You have much of which to be proud! I probably should let my very special, English Professor sister-in-law correct my grammar and punctuation, but my ego isn’t up to it this morning. Dennis in Texas"

30 people out of 30 found this review helpful

great experience so far

By on Saturday, June 22, 2013

I own this car - My approximate mileage is 8,000

10 10.0
overall rating 10 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
10/10
Value
10/10
Reliability
10/10
Quality
10/10
Performance
8/10
Styling
10/10
Comfort
10/10

Pros: "stow and go, high mpg, quiet, unlimited mile warra"

Cons: "does not handle like a Boxster, its a minivan!"

Likely to recommend this car? (1-10): 10

"I rented the Toyota and drove a Honda first. They all drive the same: they are minivans. "Stow & Go" utility sealed the deal. I plan to keep the T&C for a long time and have the unlimited miles warranty; not available on the H or T. My past experience with three Chryslers has been very good reliability-wise. I did own a Toyota for seven years (and a Maxima too). They were it my humble opinion uninspired average cars and had problems. I'm an objective mechanical engineer and not brainwashed on Japanese quality. The T&C gets 30-31 mpg on the highway when driven 5 over. It's rattle-free and quiet. The NAV and sound system are great. Fit and finish good. Zero issues so far but also only 8K miles."

15 people out of 15 found this review helpful

My 6th Chrysler Minivan. The best yet!

By on Wednesday, March 21, 2012

I own this car - My approximate mileage is 11,000

10 9.0
overall rating 9 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
9/10
Value
8/10
Reliability
10/10
Quality
10/10
Performance
9/10
Styling
9/10
Comfort
10/10

Pros: "Mucho features."

Cons: "Iradic shifting in eco. mode"

Likely to recommend this car? (1-10): 9

"Almost 100 more h.p. and 28 to 30 mpg on the highway. Sticker says 25.Chrysler thought about the interior a lot on this make-over. Even the window sills are flat so you can rest your elbow there. The grand-kids love the window shades and I appreciate the headrests folding out of the way when not in use. Give us another inch clearance when the seats are folded into the floor. This way the 4'wide things won't scrape the sides of the interior walls."

12 people out of 12 found this review helpful