New 2018 Chrysler 300 Sedan New 2018
Chrysler 300 Sedan

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Free Dealer Price Quote

Get the best price and be more prepared with your free, no-obligation price quote

Advertisement

KBB Editor's Overview

By KBB.com Editorial Staff

Large and luxurious, the new 2018 Chrysler 300 is a full-size American family sedan with a standard 292-horsepower engine and optional all-wheel drive. Buyers can also step up to the optional 363-horsepower 5.7-liter Hemi V8, which gives the rear-wheel-drive Chrysler 300 significantly more performance than its front-wheel-drive V6-powered competition like the Chevy Impala, Toyota Avalon and Ford Taurus. Both engines are connected to a smooth 8-speed automatic transmission. Five trim levels are available for 2018 starting with the base 300 Touring, for about $32,000. The Touring L model adds standard luxuries like polished 18-inch wheels and lighted rear cup holders, while the sporty 300S gets 300 horsepower. The 300 Limited is all about luxury, and 300C buyers get the big V8 engine standard.

Advertisement

You'll Like This Car If...

If you’re seeking a roomy family sedan with a big trunk, big style and big horsepower, you’ll like the 2018 Chrysler 300. The new 300 delivers a unique combination of full-size, 5-passenger comfort, an elegant and well-appointed interior and the latest in-cabin technology with aggressive styling and horsepower to spare.

You May Not Like This Car If...

If you’re looking for a full-size hybrid sedan, the Toyota Avalon Hybrid is the only one in the segment. Traditionally the Avalon also offers better resale value and higher crash-test safety ratings than the new Chrysler 300. Also, the very similar Dodge Charger has a significantly lower base price.

What's New for 2018

For 2018 Chrysler has rejiggered the 300’s trim levels, adding the entry-level 300 Touring model with a cloth interior and standard 17-inch wheels as well as the Touring L. Chrysler has also made the 5.7-liter Hemi V8 standard on the top 300C while it remains optional on the 300S.

Driving It

Driving Impressions

Chrysler’s new 300 sedan can be summed up with a few choice words: “comfortable, quiet and powerful.” The 300 offers plenty of gusto, even from its standard V6 engine. The available 363-horsepower Hemi V8 delivers heart-stopping acceleration, its 8-speed TorqueFlite automatic transmission is smooth and precise, and a Sport mode that tweaks the transmission’s shift points is standard on the 300S and 300C. Straight-line performance is outstanding, but on models other than the 300S and 300C, cornering is not the big and heavy Chrysler’s most admirable quality -- although it can easily outmaneuver a Toyota Avalon or Hyundai Azera. The additional thrust and exhaust rumble of the V8 are certainly desirable, but the best combination of performance, efficiency and price is the V6-powered 300S with a light smattering of optional equipment. And if you live in the land of snow and ice, all-wheel drive (AWD) is a worthwhile expense.

Favorite Features

ALL-WHEEL DRIVE
Despite the growing popularity of all-wheel-drive sedans, it’s still not a very common feature in the full-size-sedan segment. It is available as an option on four of the five Chrysler 300 models for an additional $2,500. It’s also offered on the Buick LaCrosse, Dodge Charger and Ford Taurus.

HEMI V8 Power
Also unique in its class is the new Chrysler 300’s available Hemi V8, which is optional on the 300S and standard under the hood of the top 300C model. It’s the only V8 engine in the full-size family-sedan segment, competing with a long list of smaller less-powerful V6s.

Vehicle Details

Interior

Inside the 2018 Chrysler 300 you’re met with a mix of modern technology, traditional craftsmanship and the kind of expansive space you expect in a full-size American family sedan. The new Chrysler 300 seats five passengers in comfort. Rear-seat legroom is ample and the Chrysler’s heated and cooled front bucket seats are pampering. At over 16 cubic feet, the trunk is also large, and the rear seats fold flat for added flexibility. We’re also fans of the 300’s unusual rotary shift knob, its traditional analog clock, which adds a touch of class, and the large 8.4-inch touch screen that’s easy to reach.

Exterior

With its hard lines, small greenhouse and wide stance, the new Chrysler 300 defines the look of American luxury sedans. It manages to be full country club, very CEO and a little bit gangster all at the same time. It’s a distinctive design and it continues to exude an aggressive elegance as it struts down the road. The more sporting 300S model has blacked-out elements. Chrysler offers Sport Appearance and Chrome Appearance packages on the entry-level 300 Touring model, both of which include 20-inch wheels. The top Hemi-powered 300C model gets Platinum Chrome on its grille and trim.

Notable Standard Equipment

The base 300 Touring model includes dual-zone climate control, 8-way-power driver's seat, keyless entry, dash-mounted analog clock, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, a split fold-down rear seat and 17-inch aluminum wheels. Entertainment is provided by a 6-speaker AM/FM/satellite radio with USB input and Bluetooth streaming. Higher trims come with rearview camera, panoramic sunroof, leather interior, heated and cooled front seats, a tilt-and-telescopic steering wheel, navigation and power-operated rear sunshade. In addition to the 8.4-inch touch-screen display with Chrysler's easy-to-use Uconnect information and entertainment system, all models come with a snazzy 7-inch information display between the analog tachometer and speedometer.

Notable Optional Equipment

Several packages and individual options are available on the new 2018 Chrysler 300. Among them are upgraded audio systems by Beats or harman/kardon. Optional safety and driver-assist features include adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitoring, forward-collision warning and lane-departure warning. Traction-enhancing all-wheel drive (AWD) is available across trims on V6 models in place of the standard rear-wheel drive (RWD). In addition to interior features and more aggressive exterior design cues, the sportier 300S and 300C models come with paddle shifters and performance-tuned suspension. The Limited trim is loaded with quilted Nappa leather seats, hand-sanded wood accents and 20-inch wheels.

Under the Hood

The 2018 Chrysler 300 comes with the highly lauded 3.6-liter Pentastar V6 as standard across all four of its five trim levels. In 300S models it has slightly more power -- 300 horsepower -- while in the 300 Touring, 300 Touring L and 300 Limited it makes 292 horsepower. AWD is optional with this engine. Available on the 300S and standard on the 300C is a 5.7-liter Hemi V8 engine good for 363 horsepower. Both engines are connected to an 8-speed automatic transmission. The V6 is rated up to 30 mpg highway, commendable for such a large car. The powerful V8 achieves a high of 25 mpg. Cars with either engine can run on regular unleaded, though mid-grade 89 octane is recommended for the V8.

3.6-liter V6
292 horsepower @ 6,350 rpm
300 horsepower @ 6,350 rpm (300S)
260 lb-ft of torque @ 4,800 rpm
264 lb-ft of torque @ 4,800 rpm (300S)
EPA city/highway fuel economy: 19/30 mpg (RWD), 18/27 mpg (AWD)

5.7-liter V8
363 horsepower @ 5,200 rpm
394 lb-ft of torque @ 4,200 rpm
EPA city/highway fuel economy: 16/25 mpg

Advertisement

Pricing Notes

The 2018 Chrysler 300 has a Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price (MSRP) starting around $30,000 for the entry-level 300 Touring model. The sporty 300S starts around $36,500, the 300 Limited costs about $37,500 and the top-line Chrysler 300C begins at about $42,000. Adding AWD to V6 models is an additional $2,500 and the rear-drive-only Hemi V8 option is an extra $3,000 on the 300S. Fully loaded, a Chrysler 300 can hover near the $50,000 mark. At its starting price, a new Chrysler 300 costs about $1,000 more than a Ford Taurus and Chevrolet Impala, and several thousands less than the Toyota Avalon and Hyundai Azera. Before buying, check the Kelley Blue Book Fair Purchase Price to see what others in your area are paying for their new Chrysler 300. On the resale front, the big Chrysler's value has traditionally not held up as well as those of the Avalon, Azera or Impala.

Advertisement
Thanks for Supporting
Kelley Blue Book.
We deliver up-to-date car values, expert reviews and unbiased reporting at no
cost to you. To do this, we display ads from only trusted partners.

To continue on our site, simply turn off your ad blocker and refresh the page.