Offering a notable array of features and capabilities, the enhanced infotainment/telematics package in our range-topping 2015 Honda Fit EX-L long-term test vehicle ranks as one of the more impressive setups in its segment. From its touchscreen Display Audio to an available Honda Satellite-Linked Navigation system, the Fit - and notably the EX/EX-L models - is impressively well connected. That said, we have noted a few minor issues we hope Honda will address in the future.

Bounty of primo features 

Where the Fit LX features a 160-watt RDS sound system with 5.0-inch LCD display, Bluetooth Streaming Audio and single USB port, the EX/EX-L come with a customizable 180-watt variant and a 7.0-inch hi-res capacitive touchscreen that recognizes touch/swipe gestures as well as dual USB ports, an HDMI port for audio/video playback and HondaLink Next Generation. Opting for the embedded Navi also brings SiriusXM and HD radio as well as subscription-free HD Digital Traffic which provides advisory warnings along with routing alternatives.

Also: Kelley Blue Book Best Buy Awards of 2016 

The latest Fit setup also benefits from better voice recognition to supplement its touchscreen inputs and buttons on the multifunction steering wheel. Apple iPhone owners can rely on the Display Audio's Siri Eyes feature to help limit distraction while Android aficionados enjoy similar functionality courtesy of the built-in SMS Text Message function. The new HondaLink Next Generation, allows Fit owners to access and download a Connect App, Launcher App and Aha App as well as a cloud-based Navigation App directly to their smartphones. The last is currently iOS-only, although an Android version is on the way. While not quite as tidy as the embedded factory system, this $60 upfit presents plenty of pertinent information on the car's Display Audio screen and offers a variety of nice touches from searchable POIs to turn-by-turn directions. 

A few fixes please  

Despite its sleek black screen, fairly straightforward commands and easy phone pairing, Honda's infotainment package isn't exactly perfect. Unlike GM's segment-benchmark MyLink system, there are no volume/tuning knobs here, only touch-activated sliders/virtual buttons. These controls are far more useful when the car is parked or operating on super-smooth pavement than traversing LA's concrete freeways or even normally distressed road surfaces where "finger bounce" frequently rears its ugly head and wreaks havoc with accuracy. Some staffers also dinged the Fit system for failing to "grey out" inputs on the main Source menu screen that that are not actually available for use. While none of these nits qualify as a deal breaker, they don't become any less annoying over time, either.

See past reports on our Long-Term 2015 Honda Fit...

Introduction

Long-Term Update: Powertrain

Long-Term Update: Driveability

Long-Term Update: Interior Design

Long-Term Update: Utility

Long-Term Update: Safety

More 2015 Honda Fit...

See full review and pricing information for the 2015 Honda Fit or build and price your own to unlock its Fair Purchase Price, 5-Year Cost to Own, and more.

Advertisement
Advertisement
New Car Spotlight

Advertisement

Advertisement