For the second consecutive year, Kia topped the J.D. Power Initial Quality Survey (IQS) rankings recording just 72 problems per 100 vehicles (PP100) while Hyundai’s new premium Genesis brand locked up the second spot with a 77 PP100 mark. Other marques in the top five were Porsche (78) followed by Ford and Ram, both with 86 PP100 number. The latter pair achieved their best-ever IQS scores and marked the first time two domestic nameplates appeared that high up in the rankings. Rounding out the top 10 were BMW, Chevrolet and Hyundai with 88 PP100 scores followed by Lincoln with 92 PP100 and Nissan and Volkswagen tied with 93 PP100.

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According to Power, Mini saw the most-improved IQS performance, finishing in 12th spot by shedding a massive 33 PP100 from its 2016 stat. But no Japanese or European luxury brand was able to better the 97 PP100 industry average this year. For the second consecutive year, Detroit-based Chrysler, Ford and GM again bested the average of the import brands with a collective 93 PP100 score versus their 99 PP100 figure.

Based on response from nearly 80,000 purchasers and lessees, Power’s 2017 IQS data reflects the number of problems experienced on new vehicles during the first 90 day of ownership. The latest IQS results showed that quality is at its highest level ever. Average marks were up in seven of the eight categories the firm measures and 27 of the 33 brands included registered improvements compared to 2016. The net result is that consumer satisfaction rose by eight percent from the previous study. Sole evaluation sector where things got worse for 2017 was Features, Controls and Displays, largely on the basis of issues with adaptive cruise control and other driver-assist items. While infotainment continues to be the category that gave owners the greatest number of total problems, the PP100 figure actually dipped by 2.7 in 2017.

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“Automotive manufacturers are responding to consumer feedback and producing vehicles of the highest quality,” said Dave Sargent, vice president, global automotive at J.D. Power. “The industry has improved significantly in each of the past three years. Today’s vehicles have more things that could go wrong but fewer things that actually do go wrong.” Click here to see more comprehensive results of the J.D. Power 2017 U.S. Initial Quality Study. 


 

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