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Auto-related recalls have taken on even greater prominence of late, with data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration indicating that roughly 100 million new and used vehicles were cited for various problems requiring corrective safety-related repairs during 2014-2015. Those numbers continue to roll up at a similar pace in 2016, spearheaded by high-profile recalls involving Takata airbag inflators and more recently those related to transmission shifter mechanisms in certain late-model vehicles from Fiat Chrysler Automobiles.

One in every four recalled cars unrepaired

In addressing the issue earlier this year at the Washington Auto Show, NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind pointed out that while automakers have now committed to speeding up the recall notification and fix process, in any year, on average; only about 75 percent of the vehicles involved are actually repaired. To help move that figure up towards 100 percent, the organization launched its year-long “Safe Cars Save Lives” campaign intended to raise awareness about the situation.

How to check for recalls

The campaign urges owners to proactively take advantage of a dedicated online resource: http://www.safercar.gov/checkforrecalls.  By typing in a vehicle’s VIN number, an owner can quickly and easily ascertain whether it’s currently under recall. While NHTSA recommends visiting the site twice a year, it also offers downloadable Android Auto and Apple CarPlay apps that supply the same pertinent information as well as social media alternatives accessed by friending the operation at Facebook.com/NHTSA or following it on Twitter.com/NHTSAgov

 “Recalls are a serious safety issue that should be promptly addressed,” notes U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “An informed consumer is one of our strongest allies in ensuring recalled vehicles are repaired. Do not wait to act if your car is under recall and the parts are available.”


 

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