Midsize Car Best Buy of 2019

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2019 Honda Accord

  • Spacious, elegant interior
  • Standard Honda Sensing suite of advanced safety features
  • High resale value, impressive 5-Year Cost to Own
  • Pricing starts at $24,615 (including $895 destination charge) | Price yours
  • On sale now | See Accord models for sale near you

 

Still the One

The death of the midsize sedan has been greatly exaggerated. Yes, there are fewer entries with brands like Chrysler and Ford throwing in the towel. However, those that remain have upped their game as evidenced by our return winner, the 2019 Honda Accord. But even though it remains at the top of its game, it was seriously challenged last year by the all-new 2018 Toyota Camry and now this year, by the equally fresh 2019 Nissan Altima. While the Nissan is larger and more luxurious than the previous Altima and offers features like an all-around view camera, Honda still has the complete package in the Accord, with the largest cabin, great powertrains and an enviable record of high resale value.

We said last year, that the Accord “isn’t just the finest midsize sedan money can buy, it’s the most sophisticated, most advanced and most impressive automobile not wearing a luxury badge.” We stand by that statement and the Accord’s return to the winner’s circle is clear proof of that judgment.

Classy Styling, Great Interior Space

Just like the Civic, which we have praised for bringing class above attributes to the compact car market, the 2019 Honda Accord does the same for the midsize market, offering a fresh, clean, upscale look to the exterior with enough brightwork to give it an air of elegance. The basic design has a smooth, sleek cast to the shape, and the roof flows with a fastback line that blends neatly into the trunk area. The overall dimensions match the Accord’s promise of substance.

That carries over into the cabin, where there’s an abundance of soft-touch materials, form-fitting seats, a large, easy-to-read infotainment screen with knobs for sound and station selection, the latest in connectivity including Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, a touchscreen that mimics smartphone/tablet interfaces, and a roomy back seat that doesn’t shortchange rear passengers. Our Touring trim level also didn’t cheap out on the rear seating area door panels—other makes use more hard plastics to save money counting on the fact that the back bench will be more often used by kids than discerning adults. Not so with the Accord. The front and rear seat experience from a quality of materials perspective, are nearly identical.

While the overall shape is sleek, there’s still plenty of room to carry people and stuff. The trunk is cavernous and has great opening. Remote latches make popping down the split rear seats simple, so there’s plenty of utility to be had.

Ease of Use

The Honda Accord also checks all the boxes from the driver’s seat. It’s comfortable with a great ride, easy to maneuver thanks to its balanced steering that provides plenty of assist while not sacrificing feedback. In our Touring trim level test car, the 252-horsepower 2.0-liter turbo four mated to the 10-speed automatic work seamlessly together and makes the lack of V6 power a moot point. This is a car that you don’t have to think hard about to drive well. If you’re on a tighter budget, the base 1.5-liter turbo does deliver 192 horsepower, and while the continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT) is unobtrusive, it’s not as satisfying to drive as the 10-speed with all that power. And for those looking for the ultimate in fuel economy, the hybrid is available, offering 47 mpg city and highway ratings.

On both the quality and safety front, the Accord offers peace of mind. The Honda Sensing suite of driver assists was made standard on all Accord trim levels last year, which includes such goodies as adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go capability in heavy traffic, blind spot monitoring, lane keep assist, cross traffic alerts, and even a driver-attention feature that suggests taking a break when it senses fatigue. There are also systems that will mitigate (read automatic braking) in collisions and off-road excursions.

The list of tech features is extensive and includes HondaLink telematics, with roadside assistance, remote locking and engine start, stolen vehicle tracking, geofencing and speed tracking to keep tabs on the young folk. The head-up display offers sharp graphics and aids in navigation by offering turn-by-turn directions and traffic sign and speed limit information.

High Resale, Low Ownership Costs

The Accord’s reputation for quality means you can count on trouble-free operation and low cost of operation. It’s ranked second on our 5-Year Cost to Own ranking, only outpaced by the Honda Clarity Plug-in Hybrid. A big component in keeping those operating costs down is the Accord’s high resale value. It just doesn’t depreciate as quickly as other cars and as a result will save you money in the long run. Considering the average transaction price for new vehicles is in the $35,000 range, that’s pretty much what you’d spend on a 2019 Honda Accord Touring. And the Accord is anything but average when styling, performance and technology are taken into consideration.

As we mentioned at the outset, the midsize segment is one of the most highly competitive in the industry today with few if any marginal choices. However, the 2019 Honda Accord continues to set the bar high and remains the choice as this year’s Midsize Car Best Buy.

Video Tour: 2019 Honda Accord


More 2019 Honda Accord

Build and price your own 2019 Honda Accord to see this week’s Fair Purchase Price, 5-Year Cost to Own and more, or check out the Accords for sale today at dealers near you.

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