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Federal Tax Credit Up To $7,500! The 2011 Nissan Leaf electric car qualifies for a federal tax credit of up to $7,500, effectively reducing the net base price from $33,720 to $26,220. In addition, some states offer their own purchase incentives, which can be combined with the federal credit. Other electric vehicle-related perks that vary by city or state include single-occupant access to carpool lanes, free metered parking and significantly reduced vehicle registration fees. Home charging stations, which cut charging times in half compared to standard wall outlets, are also eligible for attractive incentives. Nissan offers a useful state-by-state guide to Leaf-specific incentives and perks at nissanusa.com.

2011 Nissan LEAF

Overview
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2011 Nissan LEAF Review

By

KBB Expert Rating: 7.1

The first pure electric-powered vehicle introduced by a major automaker, the 2011 Nissan LEAF heralds the dawn of a new era of ultra-clean motoring. Although distribution will be geographically limited and its numbers will be supply-constrained to only 20,000 units during the initial year of sales, all of those units have already been spoken for by eco-minded buyers and Nissan is gearing up its Smyrna, Tennessee, assembly plant to produce 50,000 of these five-passenger mid-size hatchback sedans here annually starting in 2012. With a 100-mile nominal range, driving characteristics that effectively mirror conventionally-powered cars and a surprisingly affordable price tag made even more attractive by various incentives, the LEAF is a legitimate and very real alternative choice, particularly for those considering its primary rival, the Extended-Range Electric Vehicle (E-REV) 2011 Chevrolet Volt.

You'll Like This Car If...

No question that card-carrying Greenies who think EVs are the future and the future is now will love the new Nissan LEAF. Others will simply have to decide if a vehicle with its admirable cost-to-benefit ratio makes the most sense as a second or third commuter car or as a substitute for a conventional hybrid.

You May Not Like This Car If...

Drivers with unpredictable daily schedules, long commutes and/or budgets that will support only one car will be better off with a standard compact/mid-size vehicle, some type of hybrid – or the LEAF's high-profile but pricier rival for eco plaudits, the Chevrolet Volt.

What's Significant About This Car?

The electric-powered Nissan LEAF is nothing less than a revolutionary step in the advancement of modern ultra-clean automotive design. It combines user-friendly technology in a practical, affordable package that should appeal to anyone who can live within its per-charge range limitations.

Driving the LEAF

Driving Impressions Nissan has always contended that its ultra-clean character aside, the LEAF would deliver the same basic driving experience as any conventional competitor. Having put it through a variety of real-world...

paces, from urban stop-and-go to rolling two-lane backroads to formal freeway hauling, we can confirm that promise of functional transparency has been kept. Initial acceleration is brisk, ride compliance good and it's surprisingly capable when the going does get twisty. While calling it "sporty" would be an overstatement – especially in ECO mode – the LEAF does respond to all control inputs in a confidently predictably manner. Admittedly a tad numb on center, the LEAF's electric power steering is direct and decently weighted while its Versa-based suspension bits keep body roll fairly well in check. The effect of its regenerative braking, while noticeable, is hardly intrusive. Even the low-rolling resistance tires serve up more grip than expected, allowing, if not encouraging, at least a modicum of spirited motoring.
Favorite Features

Green to the core
Nothing is absolutely emission-free, but with its pure electric powertrain the new Nissan LEAF comes as close as possible to zeroing out its carbon footprint. To complement that exemplary level of eco-friendliness, nearly 95 percent of all components in this groundbreaking vehicle are recyclable.

Enlightened touch-screen navigation system
In addition to guiding you to your destination and presenting various points of interest along the way, the navigation package in the LEAF graphically depicts the range limits of your out-and-back travel per charge as well as the location of all nearby commercial recharging locations.

2011 Nissan LEAF Details
2011 Nissan LEAF photo Interior

The 2011 Nissan LEAF's well-isolated, full-featured cabin matches understated contemporary flair with a high level of user friendliness. A technical mid-size offering, it seats five, teaming decently formed front buckets with a utility-enhancing 60/40 rear bench seat that will pamper a pair of full-size adults, accommodate a trio of kids or fold to upsize cargo space from 11.7 to 24.0 cubic feet. Like much of its interior trim, all of the people perches are covered in fully recycled/recyclable material. Basic control functions are all logically arrayed, although getting comfortable with the megaload of vehicle and systems information that can be called up at any time does require a bit of personal orientation.

Exterior
2011 Nissan LEAF photo

Distinctively – and some might contend controversially – styled, the LEAF's five-door hatch design was created to optimize total operating efficiency. Its aerodynamic lines coupled with various other streamlining elements yield a 0.29 coefficient of drag while helping to minimize wind noise that can become much more noticeable when you eliminate the sounds normally created by an internal combustion engine. Low-draw LED headlights and tail lamps bookend the package to further help extend the LEAF's potential operating range. Properly filling its nicely flared fender wells are 205/55 Bridgestone Ecopia low-rolling resistance tires wrapped around lightweight aluminum wheels.

Notable Equipment
Standard Equipment

Beyond its advanced all-electric powertrain and on-board charger/charging cord, the LEAF's lengthy features roster includes a full array of power assists, driver-selectable/eco-encouraging digital readouts, real-time navigation/vehicle-information systems, a six-speaker AM/FM/CD/MP3 audio package with iPod/USB connectivity, Bluetooth and available XM Satellite Radio, sophisticated trip computer, electric climate control system, Intelligent Key push-button starting, the ability to use web-enabled smartphones to monitor and control various on-board systems/functions. In addition to its vehicle dynamics/traction control systems, the LEAF also has front/front-side/side-curtain airbags. The $940 step up from SV to SL trim brings a RearView Monitor, rear-spoiler solar panel, fog lamps and automatic headlights.

Optional Equipment

2011 Nissan LEAF extras are minimal to say the least. A Cold Package for both the SV and SL adds heated front seats, a heated steering wheel, heated mirrors, extra rear-seat heater ducts and dedicated temperature management circuitry, while SL buyers also can opt for a supplemental Quick Charge Port capable of delivering an 80 percent recharge in 30 minutes at dedicated public charging stations. Also on offer is a 220V home charger. Projected to cost about $2,200 installed – half or less after various credits – this hard-wired unit cuts recharging time to roughly eight hours compared to the 20 needed on a basic 110V plug-in.

Under the Hood

Energized by a 24kWh Lithium-ion-manganese-graphite battery pack mounted beneath its floor and warranted for eight years/100,000 miles, the LEAF's 80kW/107-horsepower motor/generator develops 206.5 pound-feet of torque from zero rpm. Sent to the front wheels via a single-speed reduction gear, it makes this 3,370-pound Nissan surprisingly quick off the line, takes it to 60 mph in around 10 seconds and lets it reach 90 mph. While temperature extremes and driving conditions will impact real-world range, a selectable ECO mode that that rolls back throttle response and steps up the regenerative braking effect can help stretch its nominal 100-mile per-charge potential by roughly 10 percent. Nissan says recharging will run $3 or less and that unless gasoline dips below $1.10/gallon, the LEAF's "fuel" costs will be less than a conventional car that averages 25 mpg.

AC synchronous electric motor/generator
24kWh lithium-ion-manganese-graphite battery pack
80kW/107-horsepower @ 2,730-9,800 rpm
206.5 lb-ft of torque @ 0-2,730 rpmn
Projected per-charge range: 72 miles
EPA city/highway fuel economy equivalent: 106/92

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2011 Nissan LEAF Consumer Reviews

Overall Rating
8.6
Out of 10

Based on 42 Ratings for the 2011 - 2014 models.

Review this car
  • Value
    8.5/10
    Quality
    9.0/10
  • Reliability
    9.2/10
    Performance
    9.0/10
  • Comfort
    8.9/10
    Styling
    8.6/10

Thousands in gas savings per year

By on Monday, February 03, 2014

I own this car - My approximate mileage is 2,500

10 9.0
overall rating 9 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
9/10
Value
9/10
Reliability
8/10
Quality
8/10
Performance
8/10
Styling
8/10
Comfort
8/10

Pros: "gas savings and future maintenance savings"

Cons: "really a 60-65 mile range as others have noted"

Likely to recommend this car? (1-10): 9

"In response to angry man in this chain of reviews that compares solar power and electric vehicles to unicorns and fairies: Why so bitter towards science? On the solar power, he could take his fact free arguments up with Albert Einstein, if he were alive. I doubt he'd win that argument. Einstein explained how the technology in solar panels works in Nobel Prize winning research (he did not invent solar panels which have been around since 1800s). Furthermore, our worldwide telecommunications system (tv, phone, internet) is critically dependent on solar power, so the guy below might also have a bone to pick with a few aerospace engineers as well. Satellites use solar panels. It's more reliable than many other power sources and much more reliable than other electronics – these panels last for decades in space with no maintenance. Our solar panels came with a 25 yr warrantee and had zero damage after two hailstorms, so, they are exceptionally reliable. The first storm destroyed my cedar shake roof (wood chips all around the house after storm), and the second storm was worse (new asphalt shingles survived second storm). In 4 years, we've never (ever) had to clean them as the occasional rain suffices. When dusty, we notice no change in power output. Anyone aware of the green technology known as a garden hose could easily rinse panels in a dry location without getting on the roof. There are NO batteries with a grid tied system. Instead, the utility grid absorbs the solar panel electricity when not used and feeds it back to my house when the electricity is needed (like nighttime use or cloudy days). When we're not using the solar generated electricity, it is sold to our neighbors on down the electric grid. Just 10-12yrs of electricity bill savings created by a $15K investment for a 5.5KW solar panel system pays off the entire $15k investment. Payoff is much sooner if utility company raises rates as it already has twice (6% increase so far….), but let’s ignore that for simplicity. After 10-12yrs, there is easily 10-13++ years of free electricity still to be generated by the panels. The only part that may require replacement after 10 years is the inverter and that cost is included in the 10-12yr payoff analysis. The panels have been throwing off approximately 14 months of electricity every 12 months from January to December even with the cloudy days when nothing is generated. That’s 2 months extra months of electricity every year that the utility company owes me based on my 3000 sq ft house and average family usage. Since the panels were installed, we have not had to pay for any electricity from the utility company and every year they owe us more electricity. The solar panels were a no-brainer investment and take out the future uncertainty of electricity cost fluctuation by locking down my electricity for well over 20 years. If inflation stays at zero and the utility company does not raise rates for 20-25 years, these panels have a minimum return of 10%+ per year. However, if electricity prices rise in any way, for any reason, as they already have, the return gets to 15% annually very quickly and keeps rising. WE’VE TAKEN PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR, AND OWNERSHIP OF, OUR ELECTRICITY COSTS FOR THE NEXT 20-25 YEARS, and that’s comfort well beyond a significant decrease in CO2 emissions, increased grid transmission efficiency (power generated at the place it is needed), and a significant reduction in water used in electricity production. It’s a pretty straightforward diversification strategy and it saves us massive amounts of money! One way to use all that excess electricity from the solar panels was to buy an electric car, but we would do so ONLY if an electric car would be cheaper than a used gas or hybrid car. Our preference would always be to buy a used car, which is the preferred choice of all “greenies” and financially minded people. But there is a huge financial advantage the new EVs have over a used gas powered car: a gasoline powered car continues to require a significant investment in gas each and every week, month, and year!! Gas prices fluctuate pretty dramatically year over year too (think of the range of gas prices over the last 10 years). This electric car easily saves $1,600 per year over a gas powered 25MPG car if gas stays at $3/gal and electricity goes for 15 cents per kWh (that’s a very high kWh price compared to national average and nearly double what we pay per kWh). The savings rise quickly if gas prices go up. The battery has an 8 year/100K mile warrantee, so, we will save $8,000 - $13,000 (the lowest end of estimates) in the first 8 years or 100K miles. Because the car does not require the extra drive to a gas station to pay an additional $1,600 per year for gas, plus the cost of oil changes, mufflers and exhaust parts, spark plugs and ignition coils, hoses, belts, gaskets, etc., etc. , the time savings is significant as well. With 16 inch rims, there will be tire savings too and the coolant is rated to last 125,000 miles unlike typical antifreeze. Furthermore, we don’t need thousands of pounds of gas, oil and parts delivered to my local area every year. It would be 4,000 – to 5,000 lbs of gas per year compared to a battery pack weighing in at 660lbs delivered once every 8 years or 100k miles IF the battery quits when the warrantee runs out. The car costs $100 or less per month to insure at full coverage (you can check that on KBB.com). Nissan was also offering 100% financing at 0% so we can keep the 31K invested and pay for the car over 3 years (also get a lot of money back in a tax refund). EVs are a perfect second car and are not subject to the huge price fluctuations and political uncertainties of gasoline and have a much lower maintenance burden. Of course, anyone who buys and EV should first look very closely at their daily work commute and their average weekend driving and make sure an EV works for their specific situation. The vast majority of Americans would probably find that an EV such as a Leaf would save them massive amounts of money that would have otherwise been spent on gas. Most Americans are driving under 30 miles per day, so this car is perfect with a range easily twice that. We drive this car 400 miles per week on average. You can still have a second gas powered car for those long road trips and you’ll have peace of mind knowing that you won’t be bankrupted if future gas prices should spike dramatically and you won’t be stuck in a line at a gas station either. Once again, far from economic disaster, this car is improving my economic situation. I will post another update after more drive time... A couple of other points the guy below forgot to check – the federal tax credit is a refundable tax credit, so, an EV buyer gets that money back even if he/she doesn’t owe $7,500 in federal tax . There are also various state and local tax incentives depending on one’s residence. With our without these incentives, an EV still has the gas and maintenance savings."

18 people out of 24 found this review helpful

Know your limits

By on Sunday, January 26, 2014

I own this car - My approximate mileage is 20,000

10 9.0
overall rating 9 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
9/10
Value
9/10
Reliability
10/10
Quality
8/10
Performance
10/10
Styling
7/10
Comfort
8/10

Pros: "Fun to drive, HOV access !!"

Cons: "Effective range in long life battery mode is 60 mi"

Likely to recommend this car? (1-10): 9

"Very predictable and reliable car with typical range anxiety limitations. 60 mile effective range when considering the recommended "long life battery" conditions."

2 people out of 5 found this review helpful

Great commuter car

By on Sunday, January 05, 2014

I own this car - My approximate mileage is 12,500

10 10.0
overall rating 10 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
10/10
Value
9/10
Reliability
10/10
Quality
9/10
Performance
10/10
Styling
8/10
Comfort
9/10

Pros: "perfect city car"

Cons: "needs more efficient heater"

Likely to recommend this car? (1-10): 10

"I've driven my Nissan Leaf for 24 months. It's been an excellent car with nearly zero costs. Solar panels on our roof supply the electricity. It is fast on the freeway, and its size makes it easy to park. Interior size is surprising with legroom and head room in the front seat very similar to my Lexus RX SUV. The 100 mile range makes it possible to do everything in a day's drive except climb to ski resorts. For that you need a Tesla or a Volt. I use our 1999 SUV for those trips. Only negative of the car is the heater which uses a lot of power, about 30% of battery use on cold winter days. Still, have never run out of power even though I use battery conserving 80% charge. A full charge of 24 kWh is equivalent to two-thirds of a gallon of gas. 80% is just over half a gallon of gas. It is amazing to drive 80-90 miles on the energy of less than a gallon and a cost of about $2.50 of electricity."

5 people out of 7 found this review helpful

Nice commuter car

By on Friday, December 06, 2013

I own this car - My approximate mileage is 7,000

10 10.0
overall rating 10 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
10/10
Value
10/10
Reliability
10/10
Quality
10/10
Performance
10/10
Styling
10/10
Comfort
10/10

Pros: "Love it, very quiet interior. plenty of power."

Cons: "needs snow tire for winter"

Likely to recommend this car? (1-10): 8

"It is a good car for 90% of driving. It doesn't do well on the snow. Range around 80 if heater is on. Snow tires help a lot, but drops the range by 10 mile."

8 people out of 11 found this review helpful

Great for daily commute

By on Friday, November 08, 2013

I own this car - My approximate mileage is 6,700

10 10.0
overall rating 10 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
10/10
Value
10/10
Reliability
Not Rated
Quality
10/10
Performance
10/10
Styling
10/10
Comfort
10/10

Pros: "Instant torque, comfort, fuel & maintenance cost"

Cons: "none"

Likely to recommend this car? (1-10): 10

"I own this car for about a week, but there is a lot to say. It changed my thinking about driving. What I like. Instant torque. It feels and sounds like an airplane on a runway when you floor the accelerator. Size. Just right for me, two kids in the back and, occasionally, an adult in the front. Comfort. All features are very well thought-through. E.g. AC and heating consumes power significantly reducing the driving range. So, the car is equipped with seat heating running from the secondary battery and has a climate control timer that would pre-heat/pre-cool your car a few minutes before the planned departure while it's still plugged in. I noticed parking breaks are automatically releasing when I start driving. The charge status of the car can be checked online or through a mobile app so that you don't overpay for hogging a public charge station. The car can also send you an email or a text when it's done charging. Etc. The car is full of nice surprises. I am yet to find an unpleasant surprise. All small things are there - cupholders, compartment for eye glasses, dimming rear view mirrors, convenient steering wheel controls for bluetooth and audio, proximity key entry, folding back seats for large luggage - can't think of anything missing or annoying. Even the locking beep is loud enough to hear, but quiet enough to not disturb neighbors at night. Driving leaf changes my thinking while I drive. Gas prices are no longer a concern. Driving range is. So, I am continuously checking how many miles I drive per kWh and try to maximize it, using Eco mode and cutting back on acceleration and using climate control. Trip planning is important. I drive over 35 miles a day and use more than a half of the battery. I have not installed the 240V charger at home yet, so if I arrive home empty, the car will not fully charge by the morning - I need to charge at public stations near my work, but not too much. They charge your car and your credit card - $1/hour. That's about $1 for 10 miles. Still less than gas, but way more expensive than charging at home. So, at public stations, I want to charge only partially to maximize charging at home. Definitely, more planning than just filling up the tank once every 2 weeks, but it's manageable and fun. There is also plenty of tools to track driving history/economy/savings/environmental impact etc. Need to mention maintenance cost. There are no oil changes, filters, oxygen sensors, DEQ tests, transmissions. The number of moving parts inside the car requiring maintenance is minimal. Battery longevity is something I need to check out. Nissan guarantees not more than 20% drop in battery capacity in 5 years. If it is more - they will replace the battery (which, by the way, does not seem to be too expensive). And, in 5 years, batteries will get better. Relatively large car price is off-set by the $7,500 federal tax credit and gas savings which, I think, is over $100/month for me. So far, I like this car a lot."

16 people out of 19 found this review helpful

Honeymoon over: first week's impression

By on Thursday, October 10, 2013

I own this car - My approximate mileage is 320

10 10.0
overall rating 10 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
10/10
Value
10/10
Reliability
10/10
Quality
10/10
Performance
9/10
Styling
9/10
Comfort
9/10

Pros: "No gas--ever! Practical. Minimal maintenance."

Cons: "Heel space in front seat (odd not to have it)."

Likely to recommend this car? (1-10): 10

"After having the 2013 Leaf SV for a full week now, I thought I'd add my review. My commute is 24 miles round trip. I am fortunate to have access to a charging station at work, so I primary charge there. I intentionally ran the battery low over the weekend to know what to expect. The range indicator showed 8 miles when the number disappeared and was replaced with "---" and warnings to charge immediate. I then continued the remaining 1 mile to my house and used the trickle charger (I do not yet have the 240V charge cable installed at home yet). I did not make it to "Turtle" mode so I suspect I still had several miles or more of range left. After a week of use, am I still excited to have the car? Absolutely."

3 people out of 5 found this review helpful

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