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Nissan LEAF

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(4 available)
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2014 Nissan LEAF What's new for 2014? 
2014 Nissan LEAF

A rearview camera becomes standard across the lineup. Nissan has removed the Long Life Mode, which allowed charging to 80 percent instead of 100. The company says the feature's rationale – the impact on long-term battery durability – was less than initially expected and thus not needed.

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2013 Nissan LEAF What's new for 2013? 
2013 Nissan LEAF

Now in its third year of production, the Nissan Leaf undergoes a significant price reduction along with a number of enhancements for the 2013 model year. Key revisions to the lineup include a new entry-level "S" trim, a newly available onboard 220-volt charger that reduces charging time to roughly four hours, and improved energy efficiency thanks to refined aerodynamics, additional regenerative breaking capabilities, and better energy management.

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2012 Nissan LEAF What's new for 2012? 
2012 Nissan LEAF

The 2012 Nissan LEAF gains heated front and rear seats, a heated steering wheel, battery heater, heated outside mirrors and rear-seat HVAC ducts. The SL trim receives a Quick Charge Port.

About Nissan LEAF

Think of an electric car and the Nissan Leaf will likely come to mind. Now in its fourth model year, the Leaf made the electric vehicle (EV) mainstream thanks to its digestible price, easy driving manners and overall user-friendliness. If not for its near-silent operation or the fact it never needs gasoline, you might think the Leaf were any other 5-passenger compact hatchback. The battery-powered Leaf has consequently found a place among commuters and the eco-conscious alike, but it's not for everyone. Primarily, the Leaf's sub-100 mile range and hours-long recharge time remain hurdles. But for buyers ready for an EV, the 2014 Nissan Leaf trumps others such as the Chevrolet Spark EV and Fiat 500e in both size and its nationwide availability.

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Consumer Reviews

Quiet But Always Noticed

By on Sunday, March 20, 2011

10 10.0
overall rating 10 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
10/10
Value
10/10
Reliability
10/10
Quality
10/10
Performance
10/10
Styling
10/10
Comfort
10/10

"The overarching impression from the Leaf is that it's a "real car." When you see a Leaf, you know it; its front and rear are both distinctive enough to distinguish it from similarly shaped hybrids. It's not an electrified version of a gas car, it's a model all its own — not unlike the Prius. One of the most interesting features is a small solar panel atop the SL trim level's liftgate spoiler. Don't be misled; this little thing doesn't add range — it just trickle-charges the regular 12-volt battery. I'd be willing to bet the high-voltage battery pack loses more energy when sitting parked than the solar panel collects. Due to the nature of electric motors, the Leaf has robust torque from a standing start — enough to spin the tires before the traction control intervenes, especially when turning after a traffic signal turns green. With a zero-to-60 mph time of roughly 7 seconds, off-the-line acceleration is sprightly up to around 45 mph, and then you see the rate begin to decrease — to a degree that you must be patient if you plan to pass at highway speeds. This is the nature of an electric drivetrain with no conventional transmission and only one "speed." The top speed is electronically limited to 95 mph. I found myself speeding inadvertently — a lot. This is always a good sign in a car. It reflects low noise levels, stability and confidence, things you don't always get in typical cars, much less in efficient ones. In normal driving, the car's dynamics are agreeable, and this is all most drivers will ever encounter. If you push the car harder, it corners differently than normal cars do. Best I can tell, it's because the 600-pound battery pack lowers the center of gravity dramatically, even compared with the Chevy Volt. The pack is under the front and rear seats entirely, which positions all that mass low and between the front and rear axles. In a normal car, when you take a sharp turn the body leans and the inside wheels get light, making the outside tires work harder to hold the car on the road. In the Leaf, when the tires begin to lose their grip, they seem to do so in unison. I'm struck by how simple it is, and I don't mean that in a bad way. The car has a battery pack connected through associated electronics to an electric drive motor that powers the front wheels through a few reduction gears and a differential. That's pretty much it. No clutches, no conventional transmission, no secondary source of locomotion."

57 people out of 57 found this review helpful

Great electric car

By on Wednesday, January 25, 2012

I own this car - My approximate mileage is 1,200

10 10.0
overall rating 10 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
10/10
Value
10/10
Reliability
10/10
Quality
10/10
Performance
10/10
Styling
9/10
Comfort
10/10

Pros: "Fun to drive, very effecient, great value."

Cons: "Choices of interior and not many charging stations"

Likely to recommend this car? (1-10): 10

"In 1996 I decided to build an electric car due to the gas prices and just for the challenge. While I really enjoyed that car for many years it didn't not have all the bells and whistles of a modern day car so I sold it and bought the LEAF. Other than not having any other full electric cars to choose from for styling, this car is everything of what I had hoped for and more. It is great car with all the online gadgets and information that it captures and the range is plenty for my daily drive of around 50 miles. I wish the range was a little more so I could make more than one trip without charging, but it is easy enough to plug in after each trip. Many have asked me "What happens when you run out of battery?" My response is what happens when you run out of gas? Same thing for the electric car for the most part. It is just like having a car with a smaller gas tank, but with the advantage you can fill up at home for a lot less cost. If there were the same number of charging stations around the country as there are gas stations there wouldn't be any issue in going longer distances. The problem in my area is there isn't any charging stations within 60 miles and many of the destinations I would go to farther than the ~100mi range don't have any stations. Need to put them in at Malls, restaurants, etc. Even with this fact, the LEAF is what I would call our main vehicle, but we also have a gas vehicle for the longer trips and vacations. It is a great car and I am excited to see other pure electric cars become available. I think someone could jump in and drive this and not even notice that it is electric since Nissan went to a lot of effort to make it act and perform like a regular gas car."

40 people out of 40 found this review helpful

Awesome car, I love driving it.

By on Saturday, September 24, 2011

I own this car - My approximate mileage is 4,815

10 10.0
overall rating 10 of 10rating details

Reviewer Ratings

Overall Rating
10/10
Value
10/10
Reliability
10/10
Quality
10/10
Performance
10/10
Styling
9/10
Comfort
10/10

Pros: "Quiet, comfortable, Great air conditioner for AZ, Great acceleration up to 45 mph then tappers off."

Cons: "Sun visors aren't great."

Likely to recommend this car? (1-10): 10

"Fun car to drive. We absolutely love it. So far our leaf is averaging 220 kw usage per 1,000 miles. At our electric. rates that is $24/1,000 miles of driving. I installed 6 solar electric panels which are producing 240( ) kw/month to offset our usage. We use the leaf for all of our 80 mile or less drives. That range will be extended as they add more charging stations. Above 60mph the battery drain rate seems to increase. If you go 75 mph on the freeway the range is reduced to between 50 to 70 miles depending on how much of a reserve you are comfortable with and how many hills you encounter. We use a 240V level 2 charger. With inter-day charging we occasionally put 130 miles on our leaf for the day. My 17 year old son drives his 4 teenage friends around on the weekends. The 5 teenagers fit comfortably in the Leaf. With the back seat laid down I can fit one bicycle in with the front wheel on or 2 bicycles with their front wheels removed. Plugging the Leaf in has been a lot less effort than I had imagined. I just pop the plug cover latch from inside the car before I get out the grab the cord and plug it in as I walk by the front of the car to go in the house. Electric cars are not for everyone, but the Leaf has worked out great for our family. (just wish we had two)"

37 people out of 37 found this review helpful