2010 Mercury Milan Hybrid: Like the Hybrid, Dislike the Technology

By KBB.com Editors on August 6, 2009 8:24 AM
Who wouldn't want to take a hybrid on a long road trip? We recently had the chance to drive the Mercury Milan Hybrid through the vast deserts of the Pacific Southwest, and while we were very happy with the smooth hybrid powertrain and mileage achieved, we were more than a little frustrated by the Milan's SYNC and navigation systems. For those who aren't in the know, SYNC is a voice-activated communications system that allows you to control your MP3 player and Bluetooth with voice commands. We connected our iPod up to SYNC and expected to enjoy the happy tunes of our road trip playlist, only to feel slightly aggravated when we had to practically yell at the system to get it to recognize our commands. Then, every time we stopped to stretch our legs, the SYNC system would freeze our iPod, leaving us no choice but to perform a hard reset and then attempt to get SYNC to recognize the device, yet again. If the SYNC system wasn't frustrating enough, the Navigation system was an exercise in patience. When attempting to enter in our destination (which was in a different state), we changed the destination state and address, and then watched as the navigation system reset the state each time and erased the address. After perusing the user's guide, we could come up with no solution for this problem and just waited until we saw the "Welcome to Nevada" sign to finally enter our address. At one point, the navigation system even instructed us to take the Milan Hybrid on unnamed, unpaved roads across the desert rather than continue on the smooth, less creepy highway. In order to avoid becoming characters in our own horror movie, we ended up ignoring its instructions and eventually just shut off the turn-by-turn directions. We hope that Ford fixes these glitches in the future because other than these issues, we were incredibly impressed by the Mercury Milan Hybrid and would highly recommend it as a daily commuter. We just don't know how comfortable we'd be if the navigation system was our sole guide on a cross-country trip.
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